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Welcome to Granite City Clinic

Welcome to the Granite City Clinic's website. This practice formerly known as Britedent is now under new ownership and we aim to provide both NHS and Private dental and complementary treatment to the people of Aberdeen and beyond. Our experienced clinicians aim to ensure your journey with us will be as comfortable and calming as possible. We offer a wide variety of treatments so have a look around our website and if there is anything you feel we can help you with just book an appointment or if you have any questions just contact us.

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Our Services

Tooth Restorations

Tooth Restorations also known as fillings are used to restore the cavities created in a diseased tooth by bacteria. Fillings are also used to restore teeth damaged due to function or trauma.

 

I need a filling – what types are there?

There are a number of different fillings including: • amalgam (silver coloured) • composite fillings (tooth coloured) • glass ionomer (tooth coloured) • gold inlays and onlays (gold coloured) • porcelain inlays (tooth coloured).

 

What are amalgam fillings?

Amalgam fillings are silver coloured. They are made by combining mercury and a silver alloy (50% mercury, 35% silver, 15% tin, copper and other metals). Amalgam is long lasting and hard wearing and has been used in fillings for at least 150 years. It is economical to use and it is not unusual for an amalgam filling to last 15 to 20 years. This kind of filling is normally used on the back ‘chewing’ teeth. Before the filling can be placed, the area must be prepared by removing all the decay and shaping the cavity to hold the filling in place. If the tooth is badly broken, your dentist may need to place a small stainless steel pin to help secure the filling.

 

What are composite fillings?

Composite fillings are strong, but may not be as hard wearing as amalgam fillings. Composite fillings are tooth coloured and are made from powdered glass quartz, silica or other ceramic particles added to a resin base. After the tooth is prepared, the filling is bonded onto the area and a light shone onto it to set it. The dentist will choose a shade to match your existing teeth, although over time staining can happen.

 

What are glass ionomer fillings?

Glass ionomer fillings form a chemical link with the tooth. They may also release fluoride, which helps to prevent further tooth decay. This type of filling is fairly weak and, because of this, is usually limited to use on baby teeth and non-biting surfaces such as around the necks of the teeth. Little preparation is needed as the filling bonds directly to the tooth.

 

What are gold inlays and onlays?

These can be used in most areas of the mouth. An inlay is small and within the biting surface of the tooth. An onlay can cover a larger area of the tooth. Gold is the most long lasting and hard wearing filling material and will last for many years. An advantage of gold is that it does not tarnish and has great strength. One of the differences between gold and other filling materials is that the gold filling is made in a laboratory. Your dentist will usually take an impression of the prepared cavity and send it to the laboratory for the technician to make the inlay or onlay. In the meantime a temporary filling will be placed in the cavity. After the gold inlay or onlay has been made, your dentist will fix it in place with dental cement. This type of filling is more expensive.

 

What are porcelain inlays?

Porcelain inlays are made in a laboratory but this will need at least two visits to your dentist. Porcelain can be hard wearing and long lasting and also has the benefit of being able to be coloured to match your natural tooth. Again, this type of filling can be quite expensive.

 

Where can I get more information about fillings?

Your dentist will advise you on what kind of filling material is suited to your situation. Discuss with your dentist if you would like a particular type of filling material such as tooth-coloured fillings.

 

The above information has been provided under licence by the British Dental Health Foundation and is copyrighted.

Child Smile

Good oral health in childhood means healthy teeth and gums throughout life. Granite City Clinic with NHS Grampian’s Childsmile programme are working together to ensure all our child patients, regardless of income or background, have the best possible start.

Registering your child with a dentist
Aim to register your baby with a dentist soon after birth or by the time they are six months of age.

From then on, take your child to the dental practice every six months, or as advised by your dental team.

Taking your baby to the dental practice as early as possible helps them to get used to the sights, sounds and smells of a dental practice and give you access to information, advice and support for looking after your child’s teeth.

 

Whitening

What is tooth whitening?

Tooth whitening can be a highly effective way of lightening the natural colour of your teeth without removing any of the tooth surfaces. It cannot make a complete colour change, but it will lighten the existing shade.

 

Why would I need my teeth whitened?

There are a number of reasons why you might get your teeth whitened. Everyone is different; and just as our hair and skin colour vary, so do our teeth. Very few people have brilliant-white teeth, and our teeth can also become more discoloured as we get older.
Your teeth can also be stained on the surface through food and drinks such as tea, coffee, red wine and blackcurrant. Smoking can also stain teeth.
Calculus or tartar can also affect the colour of teeth. Some people may have staining under the surface, which can be caused by certain antibiotics or tiny cracks in the teeth which take up stains.

 

What does tooth whitening involve?

Professional bleaching is the most common form of tooth whitening. Your dentist will apply the whitening product to your teeth, using a specially made tray which fits into your mouth like a gum-shield.
The ‘active ingredient’ in the product is usually hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide. As the active ingredient is broken down, oxygen gets into the enamel on the teeth and the tooth colour is made lighter.
Once your dentist has started this treatment you will need to continue it at home.

 

How long does tooth whitening take?

The total treatment can usually be done within three to four weeks. This means regularly applying the whitening product at home over two to four weeks, for 30 minutes to one hour at a time.

 

How long will my teeth stay whiter?

The effects of whitening can last up to three years. However, this will vary from person to person. The effect is less likely to last as long if you smoke, or eat or drink products that can stain your teeth. Ask your dentist for their opinion before you start the treatment.

 

What are the side effects?

Some people may find that their teeth become sensitive to cold during or after the treatment. Others report discomfort in the gums, a sore throat or white patches on the gum line. These symptoms are usually temporary and should disappear within a few days of the treatment finishing.
If any of these side effects continue you should go to your dentist.

 

How can I look after my teeth once they have been whitened?

You can help to keep your teeth white by cutting down on the amount of food and drink you have that can stain teeth. Don’t forget, stopping smoking can also help prevent discolouring and staining.

The above information has been provided under licence by the British Dental Health Foundation and is copyrighted.

Adult Cosmetic Tooth Alignment

Are you one of the millions of adults who are unhappy, self-conscious or even embarrassed of your smile?

Many adults spend their entire lives covering their mouths when they laugh, smile or talk. They feel stuck because they do not want to wear metal braces for years or they are concerned that other corrective procedures could be too invasive or too expensive. Now, there is an effective, safe and affordable cosmetic solution that fits your lifestyle.

A revolutionary combination of proven orthodontic techniques, modern materials, and innovative thought – Six Month Smiles® utilizes specialized clear braces to gently straighten and align teeth in an average time of just six months.

Take the first step towards improving your smile, your confidence and your life and contact us to book your consultation today.

Six Month Smiles has taken the best aspects of braces and modified the treatment and the materials to give adults a common-sense, cosmetic solution that fits your lifestyle. Here is what makes Six Month Smiles so innovative:

•Average treatment times of only six months
• Six Month Smiles clear brackets (Lucid-Lok™) and tooth-colored wires are barely visible
• Use of braces has shown to provide the most conservative and predictable final result
• Six Month Smiles Patient Tray Kits™ ensure that your appointments are fast and comfortable
• Low forces and short overall treatment times increase comfort, safety, and hygiene
• Six Month Smiles is typically less expensive than traditional braces, clear aligner therapy, or veneers

How can teeth be straightened in only six months?

The Six Month Smiles technique employs the latest technology and techniques in dentistry to move your teeth quickly and safely. The key components of the treatment are the use of unique, clear braces and a primary focus of moving the teeth that show when you smile.

Six months sounds good, but will I still have a mouth full of metal for the whole time?

No! Six Month Smiles uses clear braces that are barely visible to gently straighten your teeth. You can see how they appear by looking at the image below.

How are Six Month Smiles braces more comfortable than regular braces?

Six Month Smiles uses low force to move teeth more comfortably. Many people think that the accelerated treatment means simply “tightening” regular braces to get the teeth moving, but that is not true. Six Month Smiles utilizes standard orthodontic mechanics, but with an emphasis on the cosmetic appearance of your teeth rather than the position of your bite.

Do Six Month Smiles braces damage the teeth, roots, or gums?

There are no more risks of root damage or other issues than those associated with traditional orthodontics. Since the forces used with Six Month Smiles braces are lighter and teeth are seldom extracted, there are actually even fewer risks involved with Six Month Smiles.

Will I have to wear a retainer?

Yes, as with any teeth-straightening treatment a retainer is necessary to maintain the straighter position of your teeth. If you don’t want to wear a removable retainer, you can have a bonded retainer placed. There are a variety of options that you can choose from according to your personal preference and situation.

What’s the catch?

There is no catch. If you are an adult (16 years and older) with crooked or spaced teeth and you’re not looking for a major alteration to your bite, this could be the solution for you! Most adults ARE candidates for Six Month Smiles.

Oral surgery

What is Oral Surgery?

Oral Surgery has a wide scope and it includes simple tooth extraction , Minor surgical extractions such a extraction of an impacted wisdom tooth and surgical biopsies.

 

What are the main reasons for taking wisdom teeth out?

Far fewer wisdom teeth are now taken out than in the past. If the tooth is not causing problems, your dentist will not want to remove it. They will only remove wisdom teeth: • when it is clear that they will not be able to come through into a useful position because there is not enough room, and they are also causing some pain or discomfort • if they have only partly come through and are decayed – such teeth will often decay as it will be difficult to clean them as thoroughly as your other teeth • if they are painful.

 

Are wisdom teeth difficult to take out?

It all depends on the position and the shape of the roots. Your dentist will tell you how easy or difficult each tooth will be to remove after looking at the x-rays. Upper wisdom teeth are often easier to remove than lower ones, which are more likely to be impacted. Your dentist will say whether the tooth should be taken out at the dental practice, or whether you should be referred to a specialist (oral surgeon) at a hospital. Very occasionally there is a possibility of some numbness of the lip after the removal of a lower tooth – your dentist will tell you if it is possible in your case.
Either local anaesthetic – as you would have for a filling – or sedation will probably be recommended. A general anaesthetic (where you would be asleep), can also be used, but this will only be given in a hospital.

 

What should I expect after a wisdom tooth is taken out?

The amount of discomfort will depend on how easy the removal of the tooth was. There is usually some swelling and discomfort for a few days afterwards, and it is important to follow any advice you get about mouthwashes etc, to help with the healing. Some people also find homeopathic remedies help to reduce discomfort. Usual pain-killers such as paracetamol, aspirin or ibuprofen will usually deal with any pain. It is best to stay fairly quiet and relaxed and avoid smoking and drinking for 24 hours afterwards to make sue there are no bleeding problems. There may be some stitches to help the gum heal over – your dentist will probably want to see you again about a week later to check on the healing, and to remove any stitches.

The above information has been provided under licence by the British Dental Health Foundation and is copyrighted.

Root canals

Endodontic therapy or root canal treatment is needed when the blood or nerve supply of the tooth is affected through decay or injury.

What is root canal treatment?

Root canal treatment (also called endodontics) is needed when the blood or nerve supply of the tooth (known as the pulp) is infected through decay or injury.

 

Why is root canal treatment needed?

If the pulp becomes infected, the infection may spread through the root canal system of the tooth. This may eventually lead to an abscess. If root canal treatment (RCT) is not carried out, the infection will spread and the tooth may need to be taken out.

 

What does it involve?

The aim of the treatment is to remove all infection from the root canal. The root is then cleaned and filled to prevent any further infection. Root canal treatment is a skilled and time-consuming procedure. Most courses of treatment will involve two or more visits to your dentist. At the first appointment, the infected pulp is removed. Any abscesses, which may be present, can also be drained at this time. The root canal is then cleaned and shaped ready for the filling. A temporary filling is put in and the tooth is left to settle. The tooth is checked at a later visit and when all the infection has cleared, the tooth is permanently filled.

 

What if I don’t have the treatment?

The alternative is to have the tooth out. Once the pulp is destroyed, it can’t heal and it is not recommended to leave an infected tooth in the mouth. Although some people would prefer an extraction, it is usually best to keep as many natural teeth as possible.

 

What about aftercare?

Root-treated teeth should be treated just the same as any other tooth. Remember to clean your teeth at least once a day, preferably with a fluoride toothpaste. Cut down on sugary snacks, and keep them only to mealtimes if possible. See your dentist for regular check-ups.

The above information has been provided under licence by the British Dental Health Foundation and is copyrighted.

Dental Implants

What are dental implants?

A dental implant is used to support one or more false teeth. It is a titanium screw that can replace the root of a tooth when it fails. Just like a tooth root, it is placed into the jawbone.

Are implants safe and how long will they last?

Implants are a safe, well-established treatment. It’s probably true to say that implants, much like natural teeth, will last for as long as you care for them.How well you look after your implants – and whether you go for your regular maintenance appointments – will have the biggest impact on how long they will last.If you don’t look after your implants they will develop a coating similar to what you get on neglected natural teeth. Left untreated, this can lead to gum infection, bleeding, soreness and general discomfort. You could get all these problems with natural teeth.

If your implants are well looked after, and if the bone they are fitted to is strong and healthy, you can expect them to last for many years. However, just as with other surgical implants (such as a hip replacement) there is no lifetime guarantee.

I have some of my own teeth. Can I still have implants?

Yes. You can have any number of teeth replaced with implants – from one single tooth to a complete set.

Can implants always be used to replace missing teeth?
It depends on the condition of the bone in your jaw. Your dentist will arrange for a number of special tests to find out the amount of bone still there. If there is not enough, or if it isn’t healthy enough, it may not be possible to place implants without grafting bone into the area first.

Do implants hurt?

Placing an implant is often easier than taking a tooth out and is usually done using a simple local anaesthetic. You will not feel any pain at the time but, just like after an extraction, you may feel some discomfort during the week after the surgery.

Sometimes your dentist might give you a sedative if you are very nervous or if the case is a complicated one. General anaesthetics are rarely used for implants and are generally only used for very complicated cases.

How long does the treatment take?

Your dental team will be able to give you a rough timetable before the treatment starts.

Some false teeth can now even be fitted at the same time as the implants (these are called ‘immediate implants’). Check with your dental team to see whether these are suitable for you. Usually the false teeth are fitted 3 to 4 months after the implants are put in. Sometimes treatment takes longer and your dental team will be able to talk to you about your treatment time.

What about aftercare?

Your dental team will give you instructions on how to look after your implant. They may give you some painkillers after the surgery – or make sure you have some at home – to take over the next few days if you need them.

What happens next?

After your implants have been placed, the bone in your jaw needs to grow onto them and fuse to them. This usually takes a few months. Sometimes the implants may be stable enough when they are placed for the false teeth to be fitted sooner than this.

If you are having one, two or three teeth replaced, you may have a temporary denture in the meantime. If you already have full dentures, you can keep wearing these while your implants are healing. Your dentures will need altering, to fit properly after the surgery, and a ‘healing cap’ will usually be placed onto the implant site to protect it.

Are the implant teeth difficult to clean?

No. But aftercare is important if you are going to have a long-lasting, successful implant. Your dental team should give you detailed advice on how to look after your implants. Cleaning around the teeth attached to the implants is no more difficult than cleaning natural teeth. However, there may be areas that are difficult to reach and you’ll be shown how to clean them. You may need to visit your hygienist more often but your dental team will be able to talk to you about this.

If I had gum disease when I had my own teeth, will I get it with the implants?

Yes, if you don’t care for them well enough. If you keep them clean and have them regularly checked by your dental team you should not have any problems. Smoking also affects the health of implants. So, if you smoke, you may need to look after your implants more carefully. Some dentists will not place dental implants in people who are smokers.

Can I take the teeth out if they are fixed to implants?

Most teeth attached to implants can only be fitted and removed by the dentist. However, if you have removable dentures attached to the implants, you’ll be able to take them out for cleaning.

Do the implants show?

Most implants look exactly like natural teeth.

Do I have an implant for each missing tooth?

If you have a single tooth missing, you will need an implant to support it. If you have a number of teeth missing, and these are next to each other, you could still have one implant for each tooth. Or you may find that, if you have two or more implants, they may be able to support more than one tooth each. Your dentist will talk to you about the best option for you.

What if I have an accident?

Implants and the teeth they support can be damaged by an accident in the same way that natural teeth can. So it is important that you wear a professionally made mouthguard if you play sports that involve contact or moving objects. See our leaflet ‘Tell me about Mouthguards’. If just the teeth are damaged, they can usually be removed from the implant and replaced.

However, if the titanium implant itself is damaged beyond repair, it can be safely left in the jaw if it is too difficult to remove. Another implant may be fitted alongside it to replace the damaged one.

What happens if the implant does not fuse with the bone?

This happens very rarely. If the implant becomes loose during the healing period, or just after, it is easily removed and your jaw will heal in the normal way. Once your jaw has healed, another implant can be placed there. Or the dentist can make a bridge, fitting it to the implanted false teeth that have been successful.

How much will it cost?

In many situations, the cost of the treatment is only a little more than the cost of more conventional dental treatment with crowns and bridges. Over the longer term, implants are usually a more cost-effective and satisfactory option.

There are other advantages to implants, too. If you have an implant to replace a single tooth, there is no need to cut down the teeth either side of it. If you had a bridge, your dentist would need to do this and fit crowns to these teeth to support the bridge.

Normal dentures often mean that your eating and drinking are affected because the dentures may move about. But teeth attached to an implant don’t cause this problem, because they are anchored to the bone more firmly than natural teeth.

 

The above information has been provided under licence by the British Dental Health Foundation and is copyrighted.

Periodontal Therapy

What is gum disease?
Gum disease is described as swelling, soreness or infection of the tissues supporting the teeth. There are two main forms of gum disease: gingivitis and periodontal disease.

What is gingivitis?
Gingivitis means ‘inflammation of the gums’. This is when the gums around the teeth become very red and swollen. Often the swollen gums bleed when they are brushed during cleaning.

What is periodontal disease?
Long-standing gingivitis can turn into periodontal disease. There are a number of types of periodontal disease and they all affect the tissues supporting the teeth. As the disease gets worse the bone anchoring the teeth in the jaw is lost, making the teeth loose. If this is not treated, the teeth may eventually fall out.

Am I likely to suffer from gum disease?
Probably. Most people suffer from some form of gum disease, and it is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. However, the disease develops very slowly in most people, and it can be slowed down to a rate that should allow you to keep most of your teeth for life.

What is the cause of gum disease?
All gum disease is caused by plaque. Plaque is a film of bacteria which forms on the surface of the teeth every day. Many of the bacteria in plaque are completely harmless, but there are some that have been shown to be the main cause of gum disease. To prevent and treat gum disease, you need to make sure you remove all the plaque from your teeth every day. This is done by brushing and cleaning in between the teeth with ‘interdental’ brushes or floss. See our leaflet ‘Tell me about Caring for my teeth and gums’ for how to do this.

How will smoking affect my gums and teeth?
Smoking can also make gum disease worse. People who smoke are more likely to produce bacterial plaque, which leads to gum disease. The gums are affected because smoking causes a lack of oxygen in the bloodstream, so the infected gums don’t heal. Smoking causes people to have more plaque and the gum disease to get worse more quickly than in non-smokers. Gum disease is still a major cause of tooth loss in adults.

What happens if gum disease is not treated?
Unfortunately, gum disease does not usually cause pain as it gets worse so you do not notice the damage it is doing. However, the bacteria are sometimes more active and this makes your gums sore. This can lead to gum abscesses, and pus may ooze from around the teeth. Over a number of years, the bone supporting the teeth can be lost. If the disease is left untreated for a long time, treatment can be more difficult.

What do I do if I think I have gum disease?
The first thing to do is visit your dental team for a thorough check-up of your teeth and gums. They will measure the ‘cuff’ of gum around each tooth to see if there is any sign that periodontal disease has started. X-rays may also be needed to see the amount of bone that has been lost. This assessment is very important, so the correct treatment can be prescribed for you.

What treatments are needed?
Your dental team will remove all plaque and tartar from your teeth. You will also be shown how to remove plaque successfully yourself, cleaning all the surfaces of your teeth thoroughly and effectively. This may take a number of sessions with the dental team. A good oral care routine at home with brushing and interdental cleaning is the most important thing you can do to help prevent gum disease getting worse.

What else may be needed?
Once your teeth are clean, your dental team may need to treat the roots of the teeth to make sure that the last pockets of bacteria are removed. This is called ‘root planing’. You’ll probably need the treatment area to be numbed before anything is done. Afterwards, you may feel some discomfort for up to 48 hours.

How do I know if I have gum disease?
The first sign is blood on your toothbrush or in the toothpaste you spit out after cleaning your teeth. Your gums may also bleed when you are eating, leaving a bad taste in your mouth. Your breath may also become unpleasant.

Once I have had periodontal disease, can I get it again?
There is no cure for periodontal disease, but it can be controlled as long as you keep up the home care you have been taught. Any further loss of bone will be very slow and it may stop altogether. However, you must make sure you remove plaque every day, and go for regular check-ups by the dental team.

I have heard gum disease is linked with other health conditions – is this true?
In recent years gum disease has been linked with general health conditions such as diabetes, strokes, cardiovascular disease, poor pregnancy outcomes and even dementia. More research is needed to understand how these links work but there is more and more evidence that having a healthy mouth and gums can help improve your general health and reduce the costs of medical treatment.

 

The above information has been provided under licence by the British Dental Health Foundation and is copyrighted.

Meet Our Clinicians

Mehdi A Shams

Mehdi A Shams

GDC No. 85363

Mehdi graduated from the University of Dundee with a BDS degree in 2005. He worked as a Vocational Trainee and then as a Dental Associate in Perth, before moving to Aberdeen and starting up Grandholm Dental Clinic in 2008 in Bridge of Don. In 2010 Mehdi started training new graduates in General Practice as a Dental Vocational Trainer which then extended to Dental Therapy Training. He has a special interest in adult cosmetic tooth alignment and dental implantology and also carries out sedation for anxious patients. He successfully completed a MSc in Dental Implantology Degree at the University of Central Lancashire with Merit in 2017 and is a Member of the Faculty of General Dental Practitioners. In early 2018, he acquired Britedent Clinic in Aberdeen's city centre, re-branding it to Granite City Clinic. He currently acts as Principal Dentist for both Grandholm Dental Clinic and Granite City Clinic.

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Mehdi A Shams

BDS (Dund), MSc (UCLan), MFGDP (UK)
Azadeh Safarvarkiani

Azadeh Safarvarkiani

GDC No. 245484

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Azadeh Safarvarkiani

DDS (Tehran)

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Why Choose Us

Same Day Dental Emergency Appointments

1

Over 10 Years of
Experience

2

Offering Sedation Services

3

Six Month Smiles Provider

4

NHS and Private Plans Available

5

Interest Free Payment Options

6

Request a Consultation

Contact Us

147 Holburn Street,
Aberdeen AB10 6BL
01224 592277